Contest Category : Nominations Committee

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Total votes for the Contest "Nominations Committee" : 0

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Tracy Bear

Category : Nominations Committee
Tracy Bear is a Nehiyaw’iskwew academic and member of the Montreal Lake Cree Nation located in Northern Saskatchewan. She is an Assistant Professor - cross appointed between the Faculty of Native Studies and Department of Women’s and Gender Studies. Her dissertation, Power in My Blood: Corporeal Sovereignty Through a Praxis of Indigenous Eroticanalysis won the Governor General's Gold Medal for Academic Excellence in 2016. Dr. Bear utilizes decolonial methodologies and epistemologies of Indigenous Studies to research areas of Indigenous Erotics & Eroticanalysis; Indigenous Feminism, Gender and Sexuality, Land & Body Politics; and Contemporary Indigenous Art. Since its inception in 2013, Dr. Bear has been a member of the National Collective of Walking With Our Sisters (WWOS) - a memorial art installation to honour and remember over 1600 missing and murdered Indigenous Women, girls and genderful people in Canada. A prison abolitionist, Dr. Bear also works in the area of critical prison studies and develops and teaches Indigenous themed courses in several prisons in Alberta. She is a co-producer of a show called Tipi Confessions with Kim Tallbear and Kirsten Lindquist. Hosted several times per year, Tipi Confessions is a series of erotically themed storytelling and performance based shows. These events serve as jumping off points for decolonial and critical action based research at the University of Alberta.   Personal Statement: I have been attending the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association’s yearly conference since 2012 at Mohegan Sun, and have also been following NAISA since 2010. As a relatively new faculty member at the University of Alberta I appreciate the dedicated work of the association and its encouragement to further Indigenous and Native American studies across the globe. After several years of participating in, and presenting at, the NAISA annual meeting, I wish to become more involved. I believe the breadth of my interdisciplinary research areas, connection to NAISA and its members, and interest in the field of Indigenous studies would be a great addition to “identify strong candidates from existing membership of the Association for each office” and serve as a strong member of the Nominations Committee.

Ashley Glassbur..

Category : Nominations Committee
Aya!  I am a member of the Miami Nation of Indians of Indiana. I serve on the tribal language and culture committee and as a consultant on research requests for tribal council.  I am an assistant professor at Eastern Michigan University, where I teach Indigenous feminisms, critical ethnic studies, and interdisciplinary methods and methodologies.  I received my PhD in Women's and Gender Studies from Rutgers University in 2014, and I co-chair the Indigenous Peoples Caucus of the National Women's Studies Association.   There are two strains of my research: decolonial interventions in language revitalization and the making of contemporary Indigenous subjectivities through popular historical narratives. My interdisciplinary research brings together a critical analysis of history-making with contemporary tribal politics to strategically work towards anti-colonial Indigenous resurgence and futurities.  I am currently finishing “awiikitaawi!” a Myaamia grammar workbook designed to make language learning materials like the tribal dictionary accessible to new learners and learners living in diaspora.  My scholarly monograph-in-process is titled "Settling the Past: Epistemic Violence and the Making of Colonial Subjectivities," which illustrates the stakes of history for contemporary Indigenous peoples.   I have attended NAISA since 2008.  Though I teach Women’s & Gender Studies, NAISA is my scholarly home and community.  I am constantly amazed by how much the field of Indigenous Studies has shifted since the association was created.  I am most inspired by work done at NAISA as Indigenous folks learn from each other across the globe, across our colonial contexts.  I would be honored to serve on the nominations committee and give back to this organization that has fundamentally shaped who I am as a scholar and who I want to be.

Tasha Hubbard

Category : Nominations Committee
Dr. Tasha Hubbard is a writer, filmmaker, and an assistant professor at the University of Saskatchewan’s Department of English. She is from Peepeekisis First Nation in Treaty Four Territory, and is the mother of an eleven-year-old son. Her research is on Indigenous efforts to return the buffalo to the lands and Indigenous film in North America. Her first solo writing/directing project Two Worlds Colliding, about Saskatoon’s infamous Starlight Tours, premiered at ImagineNATIVE in 2004, was broadcast on CBC’s documentary program Roughcuts in 2004, won a Golden Sheaf in 2005, and won the Canada Award at the Gemini Awards. Her hybrid drama/documentary short film 7 Minutes won Best Short Non-Fiction at the Yorkton Film Festival in 2016. She also recently finished an NFB-produced feature documentary called Birth of a Family about a 60s Scoop family coming together for the first time during a week in Banff. It premiered at Hot Docs and landed in the top ten audience choice list. It also won the Audience Favourite for Feature Documentary at the Edmonton International Film Festival and a Special Jury prize at ImagineNATIVE. She is now directing and producing a film project that opens up and explores the fraught relationship between Indigenous peoples and settlers on the prairies, done with the participation of the family of the late Colten Boushie.   Candidate Statement: I am a scholar who blends my community-based research with my creative work. I also have experience both founding and sitting on different boards, committees and working groups, including the newly formed Indigenous Advisory Council for the National Film Board of Canada. I look forward to the opportunity to contribute to NAISA.

Kyle Mays

Category : Nominations Committee
Kyle T. Mays (Black/Saginaw Anishinaabe) is a transdisciplinary scholar of Afro-Indigenous studies, Indigenous studies, Indigenous popular culture and urban history. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of African American Studies and the American Indian Studies Center at UCLA. He earned his Ph.D. in history from the Department of History at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He has a forthcoming book titled, Hip Hop Beats, Indigenous Rhymes: Modernity and Hip Hop in Indigenous North America (SUNY Press, 2018) and is finishing another book titled, Indigenous Detroit: An Indigenous History of the Motor City.   Candidate Statement: I have been a member of NAISA since 2010, and was one of the founding managing editors of the NAIS Journal. In working at the intersection of Black and Indigenous studies, I continue to find ways to think critically about the links between antiblackness and settler colonialism, which are key cultural, economic, political, and social phenomenon that continue to shape Black and Indigenous relations in the United States. I would love to be a part of the Nominations Committee, which is tasked with nominating key candidates for leadership positions in NAISA and to make sure that each electable position represents the great diversity of the NAISA membership. This committee's role is important in shaping the direction of association. I want to be a part of this committee to assist making sure that diverse Indigenous voices continue to be heard and represented in NAISA, and to be of service to an association on the cutting edge of interdisciplinary research, teaching, and service.