Naisa

Native American and Indigenous Studies Association

The premiere international & interdisciplinary professional organization for scholars, graduate students, independent researchers, and community members interested in all aspects of Indigenous Studies.

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Call for Proposals: Advanced, Research Team and Short Seminars at the School for Advanced Research
The School for Advanced Research is currently accepting proposals for Advanced, Research Team and Short Seminars. The deadline for submissions is February 1, 2018.
Seminars at the School for Advanced Research (SAR) promote communication among scholars and/or practitioners who are at a critical stage of research on a shared topic. Each seminar consists of up to 10 scholars — including one or two who serve as chair/s — who meet at SAR's Santa Fe campus for three to five days of intense discussion.
Advanced Seminars: SAR's renowned Advanced Seminar program convenes a group of scholars for a five-day seminar, the proceedings of which are considered for publication by SAR Press. Two or three Advanced Seminars are selected each year through a competitive application process.
Research Team Seminars: With funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF), SAR offers a Research Team Seminar program to advance collaborative and interdisciplinary research in anthropology. The program supports at least two seminars each year for research teams that need focused time together to synthesize, analyze, and discuss the results of their work; to develop plans for successful completion of their projects; and/or to plan new projects. Eligible research projects will be those in which the central focus is on a question of anthropological importance; teams that are interdisciplinary and international in scope are especially encouraged to apply.
Short Seminars: The School sponsors two- to three-day seminars that provide scholars with the opportunity to explore critical topics on human culture, evolution, history, and creative expression. These short sessions enable participants to assess recent developments and chart new directions on an anthropological topic as well as to plan additional conferences, symposia, publications, and/or research proposals.
For more information on SAR’s seminars and how to apply, please visit http://sarweb.org/index.php?seminars or call 505-954-7237.

Research fellowships at the William L. Clements Library at the University of Michigan exist to help scholars gain access to the Library’s rich array of primary sources on early American history. On almost any aspect of the American experience from 1492 through 1900, the Clements holdings—books, manuscripts, pamphlets, maps, prints and views, newspapers, photographs, ephemera—are among the
best in the world. The potential for rewarding research at the Clements—on military history, gender and ethnicity, religion, the American Revolution, Native Americans, politics and government, slavery and antislavery, the Civil War, travel and exploration—is remarkably strong. These are post doctoral fellowships requiring a completed Ph.D. or equivalent qualifications at time of application. Applications must be received by January 15th, 2018, for research to be undertaken in that calendar year.

Howard H. Peckham Fellowship on Revolutionary America Established in honor of the Library’s second Director, Howard H. Peckham (1910-1995), the Peckham Fellowship supports research on American history between 1764 and 1783. The fellowship provides $10,000 for a project involving a residence of two months or more at the Library.

Earhart Fellowships on American History Earhart Fellowships offer $10,000 for scholarly research on any aspect of American history prior to 1901. Successful applicants are expected to spend a minimum of two months at the Clements.

Norton Strange Townshend Fellowship
Named for physician and educator Norton Strange
Townshend (1815-1895), this fellowship offers $10,000 in
support of scholarly research on diversity, equity and inclusion in American history during the nineteenth century.
Successful applicants are expected to spend a minimum of
two months at the Clements.

Reese Fellowship in the Print
Culture of the Americas Funded by the William Reese Company, this fellowship encourages research in the history of the book and other print formats, bibliography, and other aspects of print culture in America, including publishing and marketing, from the sixteenth century to 1900. Projects may investigate any printed genre (e.g. books, prints, newspapers, magazines, pamphlets, published photographs, broadsides, maps, etc.). Support for work in manuscript collections will be limited to projects related to printed materials (e.g. annotations in books, publishers’ business archives, etc.). The Reese Fellowship provides $5,000 to support one month of in-residence study in the Clements Library collections

Please visit our website at http://clements.umich.edu/fellowship.php

for directions on how to apply.
For further information contact: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 734-764-2347.


Research fellowships at the William L. Clements Library at the University of Michigan exist to help scholars gain access to the Library’s rich array of primary sources on early American history. On almost any aspect of the American experience from 1492 through 1900, the Clements holdings—books, manuscripts, pamphlets, maps, prints and views, newspapers, photographs, ephemera—are among the best in the world. The potential for rewarding research at the Clements—on military history, gender and ethnicity, religion, the American Revolution, Native Americans, politics and government, slavery and antislavery, the Civil War, travel and exploration—is remarkably strong.

Jacob M. Price Visiting Research Fellowships

Jacob M. Price Visiting Research Fellowships offer support for short-term research at the Clements Library by graduate students and junior faculty on any topic of American history that is supported by the collections. Grants are for $1,000 and require a minimum visit of one week. Applications must be received by January 15th, 2018, for research to be undertaken in that calendar year.

Please visit our website at http://clements.umich.edu/fellowship.php for directions on how to apply.

A. Robert Lee and Alan Velie are editing a series of volumes on the Native American Renaissance. The first, on literature, has been published by University of Oklahoma Press. We are in the process of gathering articles for the second, on art, politics, religion, and economic development. We have most of the art pieces in hand; we are looking for contributors on politics, economics, and religion. In you are interested, please respond to Bob Lee at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or Alan Velie at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

We are seeking submissions for a special issue of the American Indian Culture and Research Journal, guest-edited by Circe Sturm, that explores the intersections of “Blackness and Indigeneity,” including how these forms of personal and political subjectivity converge and diverge, and how race structures indigenous political claims and lived community. Submissions may include scholarly essays, research articles, personal narratives, interviews, oral histories, and theoretical commentary.
Articles should focus on any connections between blackness and indigeneity as they are experienced in the United States and Canada; should ideally examine the topic from a comparative, historical, or interdisciplinary perspective; and should offer new theoretical insights about the nature of racial formation in Native North America.
Submissions related to but not limited to the following topics are welcome:
* Blackness and Indigenous Political Recognition
* Black Experiences of Indigeneity
* Territorial Struggles and Land Claims among Afro-Indigenous Communities
* Indigenous Diasporas and De-territorialization
* Cultural and Linguistic Intersections among Afro-Indigenous Peoples
* Indigenous Slaveholding and Enslavements
* Blackness as a Structuring Narrative of Indigenous Identity
* Comparative Racializations
* Hidden Histories of Blackness in Indian Country
* Gender, Sex, Power, Desire in the Context of Settler Colonialism
* Marriage-Kinship Regulation and Property Regimes
* Racial Ideologies and Settler Colonialism

Deadline for Submission: Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. no later than December 5, 2017.

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