Naisa

Native American and Indigenous Studies Association

The premiere international & interdisciplinary professional organization for scholars, graduate students, independent researchers, and community members interested in all aspects of Indigenous Studies.

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The International Journal of Critical Indigenous Studies (IJCIS) is a fully refereed international journal published twice a year. The journal offers a virtual intellectual space for the dissemination of international scholarship from scholars across disciplines that include the Humanities, Social Science, Health Sciences, Law and Education in the field of Indigenous Studies. Indigenous scholars from around the world share common experiences of colonisation. Our collective politics have been shaped by our intellectual traditions which in turn inform our work within the academy.
As Critical Indigenous Studies is a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary field we are seeking articles and book reviews from a variety of disciplines related to but not exclusive of the following: Indigenous sovereignty and colonisation; Indigenous people politics and rights; Indigenous people and racism; Indigenous people and the law; Indigenous visual art and performance; Indigenous methodologies and research; Indigenous literature; Indigenous health; Indigenous education; Indigenous feminisms; Indigenous queer politics and theory; Indigenous critical theory; Indigenous identity; Indigenous philosophy; and Indigenous science. As a refereed journal with distinguished scholars across a range of disciplines on the editorial board, the quality of the submissions will be of a high standard. The journal offers scope for critical engagement and debate by bringing together emergent and innovative research in the field of Critical Indigenous Studies from around the globe. Give your work the widest possible exposure and send your submissions to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or view the submission guidelines at http://www.isrn.qut.edu.au/publications/internationaljournal/

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From April 27 to May 1, members can vote on a change to the language of Article V of the Constitution which outlines responsibilities for overseeing the association's elections. It seeks to clarify the role of Nominations Committee in the process. For the language of the new article, the text of the current article, and to vote, go to http://www.naisa.org/constitution-amendment.html.
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CALL FOR EDITORIAL BOARD MEMBERS
Applicants Sought for Editorial Board of the academic journal, Native American and Indigenous Studies
Deadline: May 1, 2015 or until Board is named
NAIS seeks applicants for editorial board members. The term of service is four years. More information about the journal may be found at http://naisa.org/NAIS
Scope of NAIS: NAIS is a blind/peer reviewed scholarly journal published two times a year by the University of Minnesota Press.
Qualification and requirements of candidates: Key qualities sought for the position of editorial board members: an established record of scholarship in Native and Indigenous studies, including strong awareness of the worldwide scope of Indigenous studies; commitment to actively serving in an advisory capacity to the editors and to furthering their vision of the Journal and fulfilling its mandate; and willingness to take up various duties appropriate to the role of editorial board, including (at the editor’s discretion) the assessment of manuscripts. Candidates must be members in good standing of NAISA, and maintain their membership for the duration of the appointment.
The applications packet should include:
• Cover letter providing information about the applicant’s qualifications.
• Curriculum vita.
All application packets (in PDF format) should be sent to:
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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Those folks appearing on the program should register for the conference by 4/17. You can do so at https://www.eventinterface.com/registration/hkb1s77.

Looking forward to seeing everyone in D.C. June 4-6!!!
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International Symposium, University of Mainz, 25-27 June 2015

Biopolitics – Geopolitics – Sovereignty – Life:
Settler Colonialisms and Indigenous Presences in North America

Organizers: Dr. René Dietrich (Mainz), Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf (Bremen)

This conference takes issue with biopolitics and geopolitics in the settler nations of North America, executed through continuing techniques of dispossession and surveillance of Indigenous populations, as well as with corresponding forms of sovereignty, agency, and life exercised in the matrix of biopower.

Biopolitical attempts to regulate Indigenous peoples – via removal, assimilation, education, administration, representation, genealogical politics, surveillance and disciplinary regimes – subject Indigenous nations to settler colonial rule by depoliticizing them. Biopolitical practices act towards Indigenous nations not as sovereign political entities in their own right, but subsume them under the imaginary racialized population of ‘Indians’ that is mainly defined through its separation from the settlers’ body politic proper. At the same time, Morgan Brigg’s concept of ‘terrapolitics’ and Mark Rifkin’s concept of ‘bare habitance’ have crucially pointed out that discussions of settler colonial biopolitics of racialization and regulation should not come at the expense of geopolitics of dispossession and removal. In this light, recent interrogations of settler colonial violence against Indigenous lands and lives in the production of colonial space in the U.S. and Canada (Mishuana Goeman) and the employment of “Indianness” for the transit of U.S. empire (Jodi Byrd) manifest the link between theories of bio- and geopolitics as an integral instrument to critique settler colonial techniques and practices.

Life itself, however, was less in the focus of critical inquiry. Putting forth that life is situated at a crucial junction between bio- and geopolitics, this conference wants to advance recent work by exploring and theorizing the different politics and epistemologies (concepts, forms, knowledges) of life in settler and Indigenous contexts in relation to bio- and geopolitical practices. It seeks to investigate how these can help to formulate ‘life’ as a category for political analysis and critique in settler-Indigenous relations, in evolving formations of sovereignty and agency, and in the struggle for decolonization.

We thus invite scholars of various disciplines engaged in these issues to discuss how an in-depth exploration of ‘life’ as a critical concept and political category in the tension between bio- and geopolitical practices and Indigenous forms of sovereignty and agency helps to further illuminate the complex, contested and still largely asymmetrical relations and interactions between settler colonialisms and Indigenous presences in North America.
Confirmed speakers include: Mishuana Goeman (U of California), Mark Rifkin (U of North Carolina), Andrea Smith (U of California), Michael R. Griffiths (U of Wollongong), Robert Nichols (U of Minnesota), Audra Simpson (Columbia), Brian Hudson (U of Oklahoma), Sandy Grande (Connecticut College), Jaqueline Fear-Segal (U of East Anglia)

For further information see: http://www.blogs.uni-mainz.de/fb05-indigstudiesconf/

For any questions please contact: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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