Naisa

Native American and Indigenous Studies Association

The premiere international & interdisciplinary professional organization for scholars, graduate students, independent researchers, and community members interested in all aspects of Indigenous Studies.

Blogs


LASA2017 / Dialogues of Knowledge
XXXV International Congress of the Latin American Studies Association April 29 – May 1, 2017, Lima, Peru
Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú: PUCP The Latin American Studies Association (LASA) is the largest professional Association in the world for individuals and institutions engaged in the study of Latin America. With over 12,000 members, nearly 60 percent of whom reside outside the United States, LASA is the one association that brings together experts on Latin America from all disciplines and diverse occupational endeavors, across the globe. https://lasa.international.pitt.edu/eng/congress/

SAR 2017-2018 Resident Scholar Fellowships Offered
The School for Advanced Research will begin accepting applications for 2017-2018 Resident Scholar fellowships on September 1, 2016

Nine-month Resident Scholar Fellowships are awarded to scholars who have completed their research and analysis in the social sciences, humanities, Latino/a Studies, and Native Studies and who need time to reflect, debate, and write. Fellowships are awarded annually by the School for Advanced Research (SAR) to five or six scholars who have completed their research and who need time to prepare manuscripts or dissertations on topics important to the understanding of humankind. Resident scholars may approach their research from the perspective of anthropology or from related fields such as history and sociology. Scholars from the humanities and social sciences are encouraged to apply.

The tenure runs from 9/1/17 to 5/31/18 and includes a stipend and low-cost housing.

The deadline for application is November 7, 2015.

Founded in 1907, SAR is a residential center focused on the cultivation of innovative research in anthropology, broadly defined, as well as the work of Native American artists and writers. SAR offers residential fellowships to scholars and Native American artists through a competitive process. We host research seminars for scholars undertaking comparative, historically informed research that addresses critical issues of human social life. SAR’s Indian Arts Research Center (IARC) stewards and makes available to scholars and artists one of the world’s finest collections of Native American art from the Southwest. SAR Press publishes path-breaking books in anthropology, archaeology, Indigenous studies, and Native American art. The Catherine McElvain Library provides access to a significant collection of anthropological works and archival material related to Santa Fe history.

For more information, please visit scholar.sarweb.org.



Carlisle Journeys: Celebrating the American Indian Sports Legacy
Friday, October 7- Saturday, October 8, 2016
Keynote Speaker: Billy Mills, 1964 Olympic Gold Medalist

This conference is the second in a series of biennial conferences and is an initiative of the Cumberland County Historical Society, Carlisle, PA. The CCHS houses the most complete collections for the Carlisle Indian Industrial School, which was the first off-reservation government-funded boarding school for Native American Indians (1879-1918). The school was located at the Carlisle Barracks, and the buildings are protected on the National Register of Historic Places. The Carlisle Indian School left an indelible mark upon the sports that Indigenous Americans have played over the past century and a half. Like the school itself, Carlisle’s legendary athletic teams and rigorous training programs influenced the complex legacies that used sports as a kind of propaganda tool and at the same time modeled the success of the track and football teams for other off-reservation boarding schools.

The 2016 Carlisle Journeys conference will provide a forum for exploring these tensions and achievements of Native Americans in athletics. To that end, Sally Jenkins, author of The Real All Americans, will open the Friday series. Amanda Blackhorse (Navajo) and Ray Halbritter (Oneida), will speak on "American Indians' Imagery in Sports." Ben Nuvamsa (Hopi) in answer to the conference call for papers, will give a presentation on his relative, the great Hopi runner and Olympian, Lewis Tewanima. Billy Mills (Oglala Sioux), 1964 Olympic Gold Medalist and keynote speaker, will give a talk titled, "Footprints." John Bloom, author of To Show What an Indian Can Do, will share "A Critical Exploration of the Legacies of Sports at the Carlisle Indian School." Shoni Schimmel and Jude Schimmel (Confederated Tribes of Umatilla) will talk about women's professional basketball (pending their involvement in the WNBA championships which might overlap with the conference). Sid Jamieson will give a presentation on lacrosse, and the series will end with the showing of the film, "Crooked Arrows," with commentary by one of the producers, Neal Powless (Onondaga).

Tours of the Carlisle Indian School grounds will be available by appointment during the conference.

We look forward to broad participation by the local community, Dickinson College students and faculty, local high school sports programs, educators and Carlisle Barracks personnel. All events are free and open to the public, although registration is requested by visiting the website at http://www.carlislejourneys.org. Events will be held at the Cumberland County Historical Society, 21 N Pitt Street, Carlisle PA 17013 / First United Church of Christ, 20 N Pitt St, Carlisle PA and Dickinson College. For more information please visit the web page or call the CCHS at (717) 249-7610.

"Indigenous Activism & Healing"

February 2-3, 2017
University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, New Mexico

As the 2016 presidential election unfolds, rhetorical and physical attacks against marginalized communities underscores how violence continues to be a tool utilized by the oppressor. Those seeking to maintain a racialized hierarchy while disenfranchising Americans and immigrants demarcated as the “other,” any meaningful dialogue addressing or dismantling systemic inequality and racism have been suppressed. American Indian peoples, tribal communities and nations have and continue to experience violent attacks against their language, culture, identity and sovereignty. In what ways are American Indian peoples and communities involved in not just engaging in a meaningful discussion, but providing solutions to end systemic oppression? Furthermore, in what ways are American Indian communities continuing to maintain their identity as a people and heal despite political turmoil?

This conference looks to explore and initiate discussions regarding Indigenous resistance and healing. This includes, but not exclusive to: grassroots organizing, language revitalization, culture, art, history, environment, governance, education, Native youth, issues regarding gender, and all other topics related to Indigenous resistance and healing.

The organizers of the AISA Conference welcome proposals for paper and panel presentations, posters, roundtables, film screenings, and workshops. Consideration will be given to other topics that relate to American Indian issues. Proposals from faculty, students in colleges, universities and tribal colleges; community-based scholars and elders and professionals working in the field are encouraged and welcomed.

Questions:
Elise Boxer, Ph.D.
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

https://form.jotform.com/62045455982158

18th Annual American Indian Studies Association Conference-Call for Papers
form.jotform.com
Please click the link to complete this form.

The School for Advanced Research is now accepting nominations for the $10,000 J.I. Staley Prize.
The School for Advanced Research (SAR) presents the J. I. Staley Prize to a living author for a book that exemplifies outstanding scholarship and writing in anthropology. The award recognizes innovative works that go beyond traditional frontiers and dominant schools of thought in anthropology and add new dimensions to our understanding of the human species. It honors books that cross subdisciplinary boundaries within anthropology and reach out in new and expanded interdisciplinary directions.
The School for Advanced Research, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, was established in Santa Fe, New Mexico in 1907 as a center for the study of the archaeology and ethnology of the American Southwest. Since 1967, the scope of the School’s activities has embraced a global perspective through programs to encourage advanced scholarship in anthropology and related social science disciplines and the humanities, and to facilitate the work of Native American scholars and artists.
Past Staley Prize awardees include William Hanks, Joseph Masco, and S. Lochlann Jain.
Deadline for the 2017 Staley Prize Nominations is October 1, 2016
For additional information, including eligibility criteria and instructions for nominating a book, please visit staley.sarweb.org